Tropical Storm Isaac threatens Haiti and Dominican Republic

Tent cities in Haiti

As Tropical Storm Isaac threatens to cause destruction in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Food for the Hungry is working in 29 communities in Haiti and 29 communities in the DR to help prepare people for possible hurricane winds (often 75 mph) and heavy rains causing floods and mudslides.

In Haiti, more than 400,000 people are living in tent cities, as they are still recovering from destroyed homes from the January 2010 earthquake.

In the Dominican Republic, several impoverished communities are located in dangerous flood zones.

FH staff is working with communities in creating a plan for response.

FH/Dominican Republic Operations Manager Cristopher Garrido corresponded today about how the DR is preparing for a possible disaster.

“We’ve been keeping a close watch on the storm as it progresses and deciding on the best courses of action,” says Garrido. “We’ve started by ensuring that our offices are well stocked on clean water, first-aid kits, flashlights, generators, fuel, rain gear and other essential needs.”

Garrido continues, “We’ve designated a key communications person for each area and have given instructions for preventive and response measures to be taken. We’ve also asked our staff to go out and raise awareness in the communities.”

Similar preparations are taking place in Haiti as the storm continues to gain strength in coming toward land.

Please pray with us for these vulnerable people and for our staff, and continue to find updates on FH’s Facebook, Twitter and fh.org.

Related posts:

  1. Tropical Storm Isaac Update: FH Communities
  2. Unsung destruction in Haiti and the Dominican Republic
  3. Tropical Storm Isaac: News Roundup
  4. Haiti – Restoring lives after Hurricane Isaac
  5. Four causes of violence against women in the Dominican Republic

About Renee Targos

Renee is a former journalist and editor for national arts and business publications. As a writer for Food for the Hungry, Renee explores and reports on the work and relationships of partners, FH staff and impoverished communities.

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