About Renee Targos

Renee is a former journalist and editor for national arts and business publications. As a writer for Food for the Hungry, Renee explores and reports on the work and relationships of partners, FH staff and impoverished communities.
Author Archive | Renee Targos

Philippine flood: Update from the field

  Three days of monsoon rains caused flooding in nine provinces in the Philippines. The flooding forced approximately 250,000 people from their homes. Many of Food for the Hungry’s communities located near fast-moving, overflowing rivers have evacuated. Several FH staff have experienced flooding in their homes, like FH/Philippines Country Director Debbie Toribio.       […]

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South Sudan: A hopeful—yet uncertain—future

A country claiming its independence after 21 years of war, with 2.5 million dead, is a courageous undertaking. South Sudan made the one-year mark of its independence—but what’s ahead?   “A year ago it was the newest nation in the world,” said Keith Wright, Food for the Hungry’s international president. “The South Sudanese were very […]

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Mothers creating social change

  The sounds of car horns, bird calls, bike bells and the stench of the open sewers surrounded me as I walked through a Dhaka slum in flip-flops. Wandering through a labyrinth of alleyways and small streets, my guide was leading me to meet a group of mothers who were game changers. Social influencers. Women […]

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A Growing Recovery

Burundi women celebrate after training for better farming practices. Hundreds of thousands of displaced Burundians are returning home after a 12-year civil war. Farm land is now scarce in Burundi. More than 90 percent of Burundians are dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods. Now, many live without the food they need to survive. The United […]

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Mom Keeps Family Healthy During Cholera Outbreak

In October 2010, a cholera epidemic spread through Haiti killing 3,300 and infecting more than 30,000 people. The island’s capital of Port-au-Prince, devastated by a magnitude 7.1 earthquake 10 months earlier, still lay in ruins with broken sewage lines, water pipes, buildings and roads. Having no prior exposure to cholera, Haitians feared the disease.  People […]

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