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Thoughts and Shots – #fhbloggers ethiopia series (via @inspiredrd)

ALYSA BAJENARU: Dietitian, Personal Trainer, Cook, Crafter, Wife, Mom, proud wearer of onion-goggles. New Celiac. Official dietitian of Mamavation& Baby Boot Camp. Alysa has one of the top nutritional blogs in America, is the personal nutritionist for Mamavation, and has been, for the past few months, the personal nutritionist for BlogHer. Alysa directs her passion to […]

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Why I Said “YES” To Food for the Hungry’s #fhbloggers Trip To Ethiopia (via @todaysletters)

EMILY LOERKE: A Dallas girl that believes it would be the perfect city if it were only in the mountains, right by the ocean with a downtown ballpark, four real seasons, and a ready supply of Blue Bell Ice Cream. Emily has been on staff at Watermark Community Church for the past seven years, and […]

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Join the #fhbloggers On a LIVE Twitter Chat July 12th While in Ethiopia & Win Local Goodies

As you may already know, FH is hosting our very first vision trip with some of the most inspiring and influential bloggers around. (Learn more about this trip here: fhbloggers.org) Not only will they be writing in real-time before, during, and after the trip, but now they’ll be involved in a LIVE twitter chat while […]

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Turning Fears Into Prayers – #fhbloggers #ethiopia post series

ALECE RONZINO: A New Yorker changed by Africa. Alece is the founder of #OneWord365 and a communications coach for non-profits. She blogs candidly about searching for God in the question marks of life & faith. Alece is a close personal friend, one of the #fhbloggers that will be writing on the upcoming trip to Ethiopia, […]

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FH Phoenix staff visit Guatemala

In February 2011, Katie Stall and I traveled to Guatemala for our first field visit. We both wanted to see FH’s work in the field. We had spent the last three years, stuffing envelopes and packets, reading and sorting mail, and talking to countless sponsors on the phone—but always desiring to see it all for […]

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a mysterious illness in northern Uganda

Nodding disease is a mysterious illness that has killed 200 children in rural northern Uganda and has debilitated hundreds more, leaving doctors scrambling to find its cause and cure. Without modern medical answers or treatments, many desperate parents turn to traditional medicine for relief, which unfortunately does not help the situation. Many parents in despair […]

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Children on pathway

Literature becomes life

I just finished reading Thomas Hardy’s novel, Tess of the d’Ubervilles, which left me in silent late-night shock when I turned the final pages.  As my friend and fellow Food for the Hungry blogger Eileen said, “It’s not Jane Austen. It doesn’t wrap up happily in the end.”  (No spoilers here, you’ll have to read […]

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What voices speak into your life?

From the back room of my house, I stood getting ready for my day. I could hear the TV on in the next room and I began to listen, analyzing the script and the voices, trying to guess what show was on. It didn’t take me long to make a guess… and I was right. […]

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First #fhbloggers Trip To Ethiopia July 9 – 16

THE FIRST #fhbloggers TRIP TO ETHIOPIA JULY 9-16 One of the first new projects I began to work on when I first started with Food for the Hungry a year ago was a blog trip. Even though I mostly serve the Artist Program, working with music artists and tours, I feel like everywhere I turned […]

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Boy in green sweater with pen

Pen, paper and a future in Guatemala

The photographer’s caption tells me the image comes from a place where Food for the Hungry works called “Rio Azul,” or “Blue River,” in Guatemala’s Ixil Triangle region.  But I see a story far beyond a young child poised to draw something. The green in little boy’s sweater mirrors the thick vegetation I remember from […]

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