Tag Archives | education

Back to School: 5 simple (and fun) ways to teach children about poverty

Crayons, notebooks, backpacks… oh my! The beginning of the school year is always ripe with different emotions. Excitement for the year ahead. Sadness for the end of summer vacation. Anticipation for all that will be learned. Sadness for the end of summer vacation. I guess you can tell what my emotions typically were when starting […]

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Kenifer hard at work in class

Where the education system stops…we start

This year, we will send our kids to school expecting them to learn. If they struggle or fall behind in class, we expect them to ask for help. We also expect our children’s teachers to notice their difficulties and assist them. Sometimes a student just needs a little extra support. Thankfully, most U.S. schools offer […]

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Dieuseul Petit shows one of his chili peppers

Pick a pepper…and send all your children to school

A struggling Haitian farmer looks out over his field, withered by yet another year of drought. There will just barely be enough beans for the family to eat – and nothing left to sell. The father sighs, his heart heavy, because of the decision he has to make:  He can’t send all of his children […]

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Food for the Hungry Child Sponosrship made Nasrin's dreams come true.

Five ways education fights poverty

My son is beyond school age now, but I still have a foolproof way of keeping up with the school calendar. When school is in session, a flashing light in front of the school near my house reminds me to slow down to 15 miles an hour. During vacations and holidays, I’m free to drive […]

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Meeting my sponsored child in Guatemala

Today was a special day. When I woke up, I knew I was going to meet our (my wife and I) sponsored child, Denis! Even in that thought, it was about me. I’m going to meet our sponsored child. Once the day started in Seoguis, Guatemala, I began to realize this day was going to […]

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Eternal relief work

The United States went on full security alert this week, shutting down embassies around the world this past Sunday. Intercepted communications from terrorists indicated planned attacks on United States and other country targets. Some work furloughs will be extended even further, depending on the threat. It’s prudent, of course, to limit the damage to people […]

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Remember the thrill of school supplies?

When I think back on grade school, my mind is flooded with fond memories of  new beginnings. A new school year with a new teacher brought about the idea of being surrounded my new classmates, new friends, and most notably, a slew of new school supplies. Sure meet-the-teacher was an exciting experience, but I most […]

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iDevelopment: Steve Jobs, simplicity and ending poverty

Whether or not you own a “magical piece of glass” (as Apple likes to refer to it) such as an iPhone or an iPad, you might be familiar with the products and why people like them. What if I told you that just as Apple is to the electronics industry, Food for the Hungry (FH) […]

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Child sponsorship: Teen pursues higher education

In Bogra City, a bustling metropolis in Bangladesh, most of the population practices Islam. Segmented in the larger population, smaller communities are set apart and house the lowest caste of the Hindu population, called “untouchables.” One such community is called Horijon. In this walled community of narrow, dirty walkways – a boy name Chad is […]

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Rebuilding Burundi One Person at a Time

In the early 1990s, a civil war broke out in Burundi, lasting 12 years. More than 200,000 people died and many fled to neighboring countries seeking refuge. The violence destroyed villages, schools, the economy—and now Burundi is rebuilding itself. It’s a beautiful country with massive potential. However, the effects of war linger on with two-thirds […]

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