Tag Archives | women

Welcoming refugees to our cities

After my second trip with Food for the Hungry (FH) to Uganda in 2007, I came home with a distinct feeling that I was suppose to work with the refugee population in Phoenix. I felt compelled to do something to help vulnerable people here when I wasn’t traveling to foreign countries for work. To quote […]

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Yubo's Garden in Kenya

What happens when women lead?

Women in developing countries often aren’t thought of as leaders. Food for the Hungry (FH) helps communities reverse that thinking. An example of a woman becoming  a leader is Yubo Boru, a 35-year-old mother of four children living in Kenya. Rather than going to school when she was a girl, Yubo would carry as much water as she […]

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Thirsting for clean and living water

After waiting for her turn in line, 13-year-old Aleme lifts her jerricans.  Strapped with 40 pounds of water on her shoulders, she makes the long journey home uphill.  The water has to last the family until tomorrow, when Aleme will make the journey back down the hill, wait in line, gather her water and hike […]

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Ugandan Girl

What’s in a Girl’s Name?—A Quiet Protest

I am big on names with meaning—names that root us in some kind of history or hope. They have a beauty all their own. Every part of my name has one or two tie-ins to my family history. And I was deeply blessed to have my middle name—Clare—passed on to my amazing little niece—Mariclare. This […]

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woman in guatemala

Gendercide and the power of words

Slang in America Chick. Gal. Dame. Babe. Diva. Girly. Lass. Mama. Ma’am. Lady. Woman. Female. You’ve probably heard one or many of these words in your lifetime. And upon hearing one of these words and without being told, I’m guessing you immediately thought of a specific gender. It’s incredible to think about the linguistic cultural […]

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Back to school at 40 something

Henry Ford once said, “Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young. The greatest thing in life is to keep your mind young.”

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We Interrupt This Monotonous & Agitating Political Season for a TRUE Message of HOPE

This is not a stump speech, an endorsement, or even a subversive political plea.

This is a reminder and a gift. A message of hope.

As our TV’s sets and news feeds monotonously tune in to the steady screeching of political debate, party pundits and campaigning figureheads, I believe it is important to take a deep breath, and REMEMBER THE POOR. There is no doubt that any election is an important and historical event. We should care about elected leaders, their ideas and what they stand for. But let’s not loose sight of the most monumental opportunities of hope we may ever face.

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It’s What You Don’t See

It’s a common sight for those that visit developing countries. The city is crowded, hot, ripe with life and decay at the same time. Thousands of people walk around, barter, converse and live life on these streets. In Dhaka, Bangladesh, the story is no different.  Rickshaws and busses play an endless game of leapfrog through […]

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Mothers creating social change

  The sounds of car horns, bird calls, bike bells and the stench of the open sewers surrounded me as I walked through a Dhaka slum in flip-flops. Wandering through a labyrinth of alleyways and small streets, my guide was leading me to meet a group of mothers who were game changers. Social influencers. Women […]

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